Millennials Besieged by Chronic Illness: From Age 27, It’s All “Downhill”

save for webArticle Written by The Children's Health Defense Team
May 14, 2019 


NOTE: There can be no denying that America’s children and young adults are at a critical juncture. Unless we start admitting what we already know about environmental culprits and become willing to do something about them, children, young adults and our nation are going to continue to get short-changed.

Millennials (the generation born between the early 1980s and approximately the mid-1990s) just got some bad news. Health insurance data from 2017 show that many of them, especially older millennials in their mid-30s, are facing unprecedented levels of mental and physical illness.

…over half (54%) of millennial respondents reported having been diagnosed with at least one chronic illness.

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How the Endocannabinoid System Connects Your Gut and Your Brain

cannabisArticle Written by Brent Bauer, M.D., Mayo clinic
October 10, 2018
www.thorne.com

"The brain and the gut speak the same language."1 — Ethan Russo, M.D.

It's true. Your gut has a brain.

This second brain won’t help you to do a crossword puzzle or remember a password, but its connection to the brain in your head plays a major role in regulating digestion, mood, and your overall health.

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Alleviation of Peanut allergy through Nambudripad’s allergy Elimination techniques (NAET): A Case Report

squirrel peanutArticle Written by Roy Nambudripad, MD July 1, 2014
Global Advances in Health and Medicine/Sage Journals

ABSTRACT

This case report illustrates the reduction of immunoglobulin E titers and clinical reactivity of peanut allergy in a patient, using Nambudripad’s Allergy Elimination Techniques (NAET). The patient’s initial symptoms and immunoglobulin E result correlated with an oral challenge test that showed signs of anaphylaxis upon ingestion of a fragment of dry-roasted peanut. The symptoms subsided after the patient completed a program of treatments, which lasted approximately 18 months. Moreover, the immunoglobulin E titers decreased in two different types of immunoassays after a total of 18 months: HY*TEC enzyme immunoassay (Hycor Biomedical Inc, Garden Grove, California) and ImmunoCAP system (Phadia, Uppsala, Sweden). A repeat oral challenge test was per- formed with peanut concentrate solution (1:20 weight/volume extract by Greer Laboratories, Inc, Lenoir, North Carolina), and the patient exhibited no reaction after ingesting up to 1 gram of peanut protein gradually over a 3-hour period. This report could support further investigation into the possibility of successful desensitization toward food allergies using NAET.

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What Is Crohn's Disease

mazeArticle Written by Jini Patel May 7, 2009
listentoyourgut.com

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease in which parts of the digestive system swell and develop deep sores, or ulcers. The ulcers usually occur in the last part of the small intestine and the first part off the large intestine, but can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract, including the mouth, stomach and anus. The cause of Crohn’s disease is unknown, but an abnormal immune system response, bacteria, viruses, genetics and smoking may all play a role.

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A Child's Suffering Drives A Mother To Seek Untested Treatments

mom comfort sick childArticle Written by Heather Won Tesoriero May 2, 2017
www.npr.org

Your child is diagnosed with a serious autoimmune disease and conventional treatments aren't proving to be effective. Doctors prescribe powerful medications that don't seem to work. Not only is your child not responding as hoped, he's withering from the side effects. What do you do? Journalist Susannah Meadows found herself having to answer this question when her son, Shepherd, was diagnosed at age 3 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, joint inflammation that can last a lifetime.

When the drugs didn't work, Meadows was persuaded to look at his condition through a different prism and to consider the possibility that medications might not be the only answer. Meadows began speaking to parents who had sleuthed out alternative theories and tried things like radically changing their kids' diets and giving them Chinese herbal medicines. Like many parents of sick children, Meadows grew increasingly willing to venture outside of the standard treatments.

Her experiences spurred her to seek other stories of people with illnesses ranging from multiple sclerosis to epilepsy to ADHD who pursued unproven methods of treating their diseases. Their stories, as well as an account of her son's case, are compiled in The Other Side of Impossible: Ordinary People Who Faced Daunting Medical Challenges and Refused to Give Up, published Tuesday by Random House.

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